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$1,000,000 Bills Don’t Exist!

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Unfortunately, no one told eight people in southern Japan who paid out over 150 million yen, or $1.27 million USD, to be a part of an “investment deal” where they’d get a return of 10 times their investment. The deal involved rare $1 million dollar bills that were issued in 1928 to let Americans bring their assets home and featured a picture of President George Washington at a Tokyo hotel… except the bills were fake, the story fabricated, and now three of the eight have filed for personal bankruptcy.

Tips to avoid getting scammed like this:
1. Try to find out if what you’re investing in actually exists. If it doesn’t, then it’s a scam. If it does, then it’s probably still a scam. (the largest bill the US Treasury ever printed was $100,000 [link] back in the 1930s and it featured the face of Woodrow Wilson)
2. Don’t believe pictures, Photoshop can do wonders like make me look like a supermodel.
3. There is no such thing as a get-rich-quick scheme, unless you’re running it. And if you’re running it, you’re a scumbag and should die.

via the Associated Press.

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5 Responses to “$1,000,000 Bills Don’t Exist!”

  1. But a million dollars would weigh a heck of a lot less if you could just carry a single bill…

  2. pfadvice says:

    No messing around with these scammers…they went for the mother load and got it…

  3. Autymn D. C. says:

    Rhodium ($65/g now, was $320/g in 2008) couldn’t touch a million-dollar bill. Nor could a record aerogel ($3000/g?): http://bit.ly/2QBeNf. Curium at $160,000/g is still short.

  4. Randy says:

    Makes you wonder how they ever accumulated 18.5 million yen each in the first place.

  5. factchecker says:

    Actually if you consider inflation the $100,000 bill was actually worth over $1 million when it was introduced although not for circulation.


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