Your Take 
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Your Take: What’s Your Favorite Frugal Weekend Idea?

Last year, I had a whole series on frugal weekend ideas like visiting local wineries, going to a major league baseball game, visit a national park, or something simple like borrow a movie from the library.

My favorite frugal weekend idea is probably to visit a local winery, such as when we visited Boordy (which ended up not being frugal!) a few weeks ago, because it has all the key characteristics in a great weekend day. First, I like being outdoors and most wineries have outdoor seating and relaxing areas. Second, I enjoy the gift of Dionysus and I enjoy enjoying it over several hours basking in the warm sun. Third, it’s a very social activity that has something for everyone. If you enjoy wine, you have wine. If you don’t have wine, you enjoy the setting. If you hate being outdoors and wine, well we’re probably not friends (and you’re probably a vampire). :)

I’d like to know, what’s your favorite frugal weekend idea?

(Photo: tambako


 Personal Finance 
8
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Don’t Forget the Big Picture

Magnifying GlassOne of the things I learned whenever I drew up our financial network map was that I had a lot of bank accounts, mostly high interest savings accounts at online banks. FNBO Direct, Dollar Savings Direct, HSBC Direct, ING Direct, and E*Trade for starters and that was after we closed accounts at Emigrant Direct and Virtual Bank.

There are many reasons why I have so many bank accounts, and I’ll explain that some other time, but the point of this post is that it’s easy to forget the big picture whenever you’re dealing with the nitty gritty of daily affairs.

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 Frugal Living 
19
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Spend to Save Trap

If you ever want to learn about consumer behavior, walk through a grocery store. Look at all the labels, how things are positioned, how sales are organized, and you’ll get tremendous insight into how we consume. Ever wonder why grocery stores have sales where they limit the number of products you can buy? You can get five cases of Diet Coke for $10 but you are limited to five cases. If you really wanted ten, all you need to do is buy five, drop them off at your car, and then buy five more in another “trip” five minutes after the first. The reason they “limit” your order is because it creates a scarcity and you’ll end up buying more.

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 Taxes 
6
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BVC #9 – Last Minute Tax Tip (Roth IRA) [VIDEO]

It’s April 15th, it’s getting late, and chances are you’re done with your taxes or getting ready to send it in. Here’s the best last minute tax tip you could possible get and you have until midnight tonight to get it done.



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 Career 
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Computer Training Software Roundup: Basic vs. Domain-Specific Packages

With the weak economy and everyone feeling like their job, if they still have one, is in peril, people are trying to add to their skill set and make themselves a more productive and valuable employee. They’re augmenting themselves, not their résumé. If you’re one of these people, you’ve probably considered taking some courses or preparing for exams so you can get additional certifications. If you’ve done a little bit of research about self-paced computer training software packages, you’ve probably come to the same conclusion as I did – there are two very separate and specific “types” of self-paced learning packages and each one is designed to fulfill a very different need.

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 Frugal Living 
20
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Cut the Cable: Ways to Save Money on Television and Movies

In today’s world, the cost of entertainment is high. However, it is also one of the things people are still willing to spend money on. A television, for example, is nearly seen as a necessity in American households. Did you know, though, that there are ways to watch television shows and movies without paying for cable or satellite service? You can use the following tips to save big time on quality entertainment.

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 Personal Finance 
14
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Money Doesn’t Grow On Trees

One of the most important lessons you can teach your children is the importance of money. While we don’t have any kids yet, it has been a topic on my mind so I defer to these highly rated books for guidance:

Raising Money Smart KidsRaising Money Smart Kids: What They Need to Know about Money and How to Tell Them by Janet Bodnar is published by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, one of the most respected personal finance magazines today. Bodnar is Kiplinger’s Personal Finance’s deputy editor, mother of three children, and nationally recognized as an expert in family finances and teaching children about money.



Silver Spoon KidsSilver Spoon Kids : How Successful Parents Raise Responsible Children by Eileen Gallo, Jon Gallo, and Kevin Gallo is a different kind of family finances book. It focuses on how to raise kids if you are in an affluent family and was written in the dot-com boom era (2001). While money has been tighter these days, I think that it covers the important topic of “trying to give your children everything,” which applies to both the affluent and less affluent.



Money Doesn't Grow On TreesMoney Doesn’t Grow On Trees: A Parent’s Guide to Raising Financially Responsible Children by Neale Godfrey and Carolina Edwards is a book from 1994, available for just a few dollars (plus shipping). How could I forget the book that is the namesake of this post? This book teaches timeless lessons about family finances and teaching kids about the value of money and personal values. If it applied in 1994, it’ll apply today (children haven’t changed that much!


 Personal Finance 
3
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BVC #8 – How to Start An Emergency Fund [VIDEO]

There are so many sites that are happy to give you strategies to get the most out of your emergency fund or how to best save for your emergency fund, but the simplest and quickest way to give yourself a cushion is revealed in this minute and a half video. (I must confess, it was on my mind because it was the topic of episode #2 of the Personal Finance Hour)



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