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Change Your Credit Card Due Dates

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This morning, I gave you five good reasons why you should go to paperless statements and I’m here to lay down another useful tip. Did you know that you can get the due date on your credit card statements changed just by asking politely? I don’t know how credit card companies pick a due date but it invariably never matches each other or your paycheck – now you can fix that with one phone call.

How To Change Your Due Date

Flip over your card, call the customer service number, and get yourself to a representative. Once you’re there and done verifying your identity, simply ask to adjust your payment due date. It’s that simple.

Each credit card will handle this different and some won’t let you change the date at all. I just got off the phone with a Citi representative and she was very helpful. She warned me that the due date floats within a 3 day window, so you you have to ask for a particular week (1st week, 2nd week, etc.), and it can take up to two billing cycles to take effect.

When it takes effect, it will make that billing cycle slightly longer. Money hackers will recognize that this gives you a slightly longer grace period for the billing cycle when your date changes, unfortunately that reprieve is short-lived.

This little tip might solve some temporary cashflow problems but if you’re in serious trouble, shuffling around the due dates won’t help.

Have you done this before? If you have experience with other issuers, please let me know!

(Photo: andresrueda)

{ 38 comments, please add your thoughts now! }

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38 Responses to “Change Your Credit Card Due Dates”

  1. TD says:

    Beverly, I suggest everyone that is a victim of HSBC’s unscrupulous policies files a complaint with the FTC. https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/ They won’t act on your complaint individually, but the more complaints they receive, the more HSBCs practices will attract the FTC’s attention.

    Your state may have a consumer protection department, as well.

    • WILLIE RUSHING says:

      I HAVE A CREDIT CARD DUE DATE ON THE 14TH OF THE MONTH.MY STATEMENT DATE IS THE 19TH OF THE MONTH.IF I PAY OFF MY ENTIRE BALANCE BEFORE THE 14TH,ANY AMOUNT I USE AFTER THE 14TH AND BEFORE THE 19TH,IS ADDED TO THE AMOUNT I ALREADY PAID OFF.THIS CAN CAUSE ME TO GO OVER THE LIMIT.

  2. angry at credit card companies says:

    I just got off the phone wiht HSBC. They are willing to change the due date but say it will take 2 billing cycles to do. How I get paid is changing. I will not be paid before the due date. They are still going to charge late fees during the time it takes them to change the due date, so you know they will take as long as they can to change it so that they can make as much money off me as possible in late fees. I hate this company! Once the card is paid off I will never do business with them again!

  3. jimdom says:

    Does anyone know that if you change your due date with a Chase Auto loan, if you are still entitled to a 10 day grace period?

  4. marachan says:

    I was just able to change the due date of my two credit cards: Citibank Visa and Banana Republic Visa. All of my bills are currently falling anywhere from the 1st to the 8th of the month and it’s difficult to balance with my “floating” bi-weekly pay periods. Citibank allowed me to pick any date at least 5 days before or 5 days after my current due date. I chose 5 days after, as I’m trying to get closer to mid-month due dates for both. Banana Republic only gave me one option, the 20th of the month, which I though was strange since my original due date was the 4th of every month, but I’ll take it! Both said that it could take up to 2 billing cycles for the new date to go into effect, so plan on paying on/near your current due date for at least 2 months to avoid accidental late charges.

  5. DB says:

    I just talked to HSBC re my BestBuy account. About a month ago I tried to get them to change my due date and as in everyone else’s experience they refused with the excuse of the new law prohibiting them. I did, however get them to change the billing date so I will get the bill earlier so I know what my payment will be longer in advance of my due date.

  6. BSommers says:

    HSBC Feb 2012 Statement: Statement closing date: 2/9/12, pymt made on 2/10/12, payment due 3/5/12. Assessed a $35 late fee! Really?

    Dec 2011 Statement: Statement Closing Date: 12/11/2011, payment made 12/13/11, payment due date 1/5/11. Assessed a $35 late fee! WOW!

    I called up and argued with a Customer Service Rep for a half an hour. He kept referring back to the Billing Cycle and the “law”. He said my billing cycle ended on or after my payments were made therefore those payments were applied to the previous month (which gave me a double payment one month and no payment the next month. He would not remove my late charges because by “law” if they receive a payment before my billing cycle, they are legally obligated to apply it to the billing cycle on the date of payment. I’m confused. Here is the billing cycle as shown on my statements: Oct-32 days, Nov-30 days, Dec-31 days, Jan-31 days, Feb-29 days. The HSBC rep insists the billing cycle is 28 days.

    So let me get this straight…if I make a payment AFTER my due date and AFTER the statement closing date but before the billing cycle date that is NOT listed in date format on my statement, it will double my payment for the previous month, show no payment for current month and assess a $35 late fee? There is something seriously wrong if making a payment in a timely manner requires me pulling the previous statement, getting out the calendar and counting the number of days in the billing cycle. Seriously?

    I receive my statement between the 15th -18th of the month and my payment is always due on the 5th. They print this on the statement: Please send your payment 7 to 10 days
    prior to the payment due date to ensure timely delivery. That leaves me a little over a week to get my payment to them. So instead I do it online to ensure timely delivery. If I go on their website and view my account summary page, it shows past due $0, last payment received 2/10/12. Looks good to me! NOT! My next statement will have a $35 late fee and show no payment was made! How is this even legal?

  7. JollyP says:

    BSommers, I have recently experienced the same thing. I’m not sure what bank manages TJX credit cards, but I’ve been assessed late fees two months in a row because after submitting payment by a given due date, I then submitted another before the billing cycle ended, and they applied it to the prior month instead of to the upcoming due date. We’re being penalized for trying to pay off our credit cards responsibly! It does seem like it should be illegal for the late fees to be incurred in these circumstances!

  8. AM says:

    I wanted my cc due date on the 5th of the month. NOT POSSIBLE says Citibank because of the “group” I am in. I asked if I could change groups and the answer was no. For some reason I find this annoying! So I settled for the 10th since it is a multiple of 5 which for some crazy reason my brain likes better.

    Does anyone know how they pick due dates? Is it truly a logistical issue for them or…(get ready for my suspicious mind!)…have they done research on which due dates people are most likely to miss and…voila! they get the added revenue of late fees! Just curious about this, if anyone knows. The brain is a never ending mystery, after all.


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