Cars, Insurance, Personal Finance 
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Does Marriage Affect Car Insurance Premiums?

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When I was younger, I always thought that there were two things that really made a big difference in your insurance premiums:

  • Turning 25,
  • Getting married.

Everyone always told me that my premiums would drop when either one of those things happened because they were strong indicators of safety. Right before I turned 25, I recorded my premiums and then compared them to the premiums after I turned 25. I discovered that my premiums fell by a whopping 20% just for turning 25.

So, when I got married to the most wonderful woman in the whole wide world this year, I thought my insurance premiums would fall as a reward for making her an honest woman. As I went to make adjustments to my policy last week, I discovered there was no field for marital status! I’m not a rocket scientist but something says that I won’t be getting another insurance discount because I can’t even tell Geico I got married.

I went to Kanetix, where I did a series of comparisons to see how personal details affected your premiums, and that form had marital status (quite detailed options too) so I’m surprised Geico didn’t care. Is this true for other insurers as well or was I looking in the wrong place?

{ 26 comments, please add your thoughts now! }

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26 Responses to “Does Marriage Affect Car Insurance Premiums?”

  1. Dedicated says:

    The discount is automatic, after you both are on the same policy. It isn’t a “marriage” discount. Meaning just because you are married you get a discount, if you both have different policies.

    When we got married, and made or vehicle insurance 1 policy, my rates went up and my hubby’s went down. Overall we saw a decrease in expense. I’m basing rate changes by our vehicle line items.

    The discount comes from the wife expectance to drive a portion of the time on the mans vehicle. Thus, his rate goes down. On the other hand, the wifes goes up as they expect the husband to drive her car at some point. Generally, unless the wife has a terrible driving record, this is a decrease of some sort across the board.

  2. jim says:

    Interesting, I suppose I never thought of it that way. I was getting a quote today from Geico and, in adding a new driver, it asked for the marital status of the added driver. It wanted to know the status of the 2nd driver on the policy but not mine, though it does ask for our relationship. It definitely sounds like it’s really just a multi-car discount and not a marriage discount.

  3. F2O says:

    Jim, you are right. It is a multi-car discount.
    I got married last September and went through this with Geico then. I too figured I could score a sweet discount by combining policies (she had Geico as well) since we were now married. No such luck. Since we were not adding any more vehicles to our new combined policy, the premiums on the new policy were exactly the same as my old single one.
    When I called them on it they verified that there is no discount for being married, just the discount for having multiple cars.

  4. Kelli says:

    Try getting quotes from other companies. I was with Geico and after I got married adding my husband wouldn’t change our rates very much, but I got a quote from his insurance (state farm) and my bill was slashed in half and his by about 20%.

  5. I’m 23 and counting the days till I can score a discount when I turn 25. My fiance and I share a car so our premium is pretty manageable. We do have to pay his motorcycle insurance so it ends up being the same as if we had two cars. Does anyone know if you can put a motorcycle and a car on the same policy and they would count it as a multi-vehicle account with a across the board decrease in premium?

  6. Kimberly says:

    My husband and I lived together for a year and a half, we shared one car, and he drove it most of the time. So there only ever was one policy for us. After we got married, I called up (esurance) and said our relationship status had changed to “married” and our premium went down by about $80/six months.

  7. Rich says:

    I just got married and changed my policy last night and added my wife as an additional driver (Progressive). To my surprise the premium went down.

  8. Stacey says:

    We received a combination of multi-vehicle, multi-policy discounts after getting married.

    My husband and I both went from a single-car policy (no homeowner’s insurance, lived with parents) to a two-car policy with home, auto and life insurance from the same company. The home-auto combo netted us 10% off of our premiums, and adding life insurance added an extra 5% discount.

  9. Blithe says:

    After reading this post, my boyfriend and I tried to get a multi-car discount from AAA of Southern California. We have lived together for over two years but we are not planning to get married any time soon. We asked if our rates would be reduced if we joined our plans together and the agent at AAA said it didn’t matter if we lived together. We had to be married. At least we are both covered on both cars for no additional charge. It seems that the policy on marriage depends on the insurance company.

  10. GH says:

    Re: Blithe’s comment, Geico is generous where they offered me a multi-car discount for my boyfriend and me, given that we have been living together for more than 3 years. So, I guess the lesson learned (as Jim had commented earlier) is that it’s not the marriage discount but the multi-car discount, which can be acquired even without marriage.

  11. Jay says:

    As was noted above, some insurance companies do lower the premium based on marital status alone, regardless of how many cars you have. It would seem that if you are married, Geico is not the best insurance company to stick with.

  12. CJ says:

    My fiance and I were on the same policy (domestic partners) through esurance. When we got married, our policy went down $352 every six months!

    • Joe says:

      Wow, your policy went down $352 every six months? That means by now esurance must be paying you.

  13. Kerry says:

    I just changed my info with Geico to reflect married status & our policy went down by almost 100 dollars. We went from paying $882 to $789. Granted this is now a year later than your article!

  14. Wilfredtr says:

    I was surprised today (ergo my Google search that found this article) that GEICO did not care about my new married martial status. Our two cars were already on GEICO and yes, the premium went down before when I was added, and we were told today that there was NO ADDITIONAL discount for being married. Bummer!

  15. Yes says:

    got married and added my husband to our one car, premium went down by $350 per 6 months. with geico! im happy! i turn 25 this august so im looking forward to another discount!

  16. RJ says:

    We have a single Car with Geico. when I added my wife the premium dropped by 15 bucks.

  17. Chris says:

    when i got married i was with geico and the two of us had our insurance policies combined (2 vehicles) and the premiums went down by about 20 dollars a month. we then decided to divorce a couple of years later (still with geico) and even though we are not legally seperated yet geico increased my premiums by 50 dollars per month!!! i asked them why and they said in an email this:

    “We have reviewed your policy, our records indicate that (spouses name) called in on 08/04/11 and stated that you were separated and she requested to be removed from the policy. You lost your married rate when she was removed from your policy. This is why you have seen the increase in your premium.”

  18. Ralph says:

    After being shacked up with my gf for 9 years, we decided to tie the knot. We had a domestic partnership on our Mercury insurance policy. Our marriage saved us $61.

  19. Omar says:

    Your experience is unique. As an insurance professional, I can tell you that rates for married people are DEFINITELY lower than for single drivers. If you call customer service to notify them that you are married, they will add her to the account. When I signed up with Geico, the marital status field was there, and I entered my wife’s information. My insurance rate dropped.

    If your wife has a shoddy driving record (I’m not insinuating that) then that would affect the rate.

  20. Omar says:

    Geico dropped my premium by over $100 over 6 months for being married. My wife doesn’t drive, and we only have one car.

    I sell insurance, and there is ONLY ONE type of discount: multi-car. The reason why the rates are less for married people is that they are classified as having lower risk. Statistically, the fact that you are married correlates into safer driving. And all insurance plans do is take the risk from the driver onto themselves.

    The price difference in the policy of a married person is in the actuarial calculation (or in laymens terms) the base price. So there’s no percentage. It’s just like having one less accident.

    So the price difference for having more than one car insured is a percentage of the principal premium amount. So – for example – if you have an accident, your risk goes up. Your premium goes up, and then they take the multi-car percentage discount off your premium.

  21. Leslie says:

    Late post but the issue is – if you are single you will pay more for auto insurance. This is not based on driving record, age, area of the country or sex. This is discrimination. There is no statistical data to support a higher premium for car insurance for singles vs married.
    Talk to your insurance company – find out if they are charging more for being single and then use the word discrimination. ask fir the statistics.

    • Victoria says:

      Insurance companies are based on statistical risk factors. (as noted by Omar above)

      This is a link to an article that states that married people are less likely to get in a car accident.
      http://money.howstuffworks.com/personal-finance/auto-insurance/marriage-affect-auto-insurance.htm

      It makes sense both in the manner that married individuals may drive less reckless since they have someone so important in their life and that they may drive much less since they most likely go places together often and share driving responsibilities. Moreover, the article points out that whatever the cause, it is statistically seen that married individuals get in less accidents.

      Would it not then be discriminating towards married people to charge them just as much if they are presenting less risk to the insurance company?

  22. Joe Wilson says:

    A married couple whom I’m friends with just got a rate quote from Progressive. They have been with Geico for 10 years. I could care less what insurance people use however this must be said. Geico has been charging them 800 dollars per year more than progressive offered out the gate. Pretty sad when you take advantage of your LOYAL customers. Geico better stop spending all their money on talking lizards and get it together.

  23. Dave Ackerman says:

    @Joe Wilson

    Progressive is about $500 a year more expensive for me – so it’s must be an isolated situation. I’ve had no issues with GEICO. I’ve been with them for close to 10 years.

  24. Ambro says:

    I had one DUI two years ago while in my bf’s vehicle. Geico sent me a form to fill out details, and once they saw that we lived together, his insurance doubled until I later moved out and mailed them proof of my new address. If I get married, will the same happen to my new husband? No more traffic violations on record, of course.


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