Personal Finance 
44
comments

Fun Trivia Facts about the $500 Bill

Email  Print Print  

Nowadays the highest denomination bill you can find is the $100 but back in the early 20th century, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was printing bills as high as $100,000 (1934-35). There aren’t any high denomination bills left, after printing was officially discontinued in 1969 by President Nixon. It was an attempt to combat organized crime and there while they are still legal tender, their value to collectors far exceeds their face value nowadays. There aren’t many left though, so if you find one, take very good care of it!

Let’s have some fun facts!

Fun Facts about the $500 Bill

  • Here’s your first fun fact – There were two designs for the $500 bill, a 1918 design with a blue seal and a 1928/1934 design with a green seal.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics’ inflation calculator, $500 in 1928 is worth approximately $6,335.88.
  • Depending on the quality of the bill, the 1918 bill is worth as much as $35,000 and the 1928/1934 version can fetch as much as $15,000 on the collector’s market.

  • 1918 Blue Seal Design

    $500 1918 Marshall Blue Seal Design Front$500 1918 Marshall Blue Seal Design Back

  • John Marshall is featured on the face of 1918 blue seal design.
  • Marshall has a distinguished career as a statesman. He was a member of the House of Representatives, Secretary of State under John Adams, and the longest serving Supreme Court Chief Justice, sitting from 1801 to 1835.
  • Marshall was one of the non-Presidents to appear on a bill. Benjamin Franklin is on the $100 and Alexander Hamilton on the the $10 (Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury, is on the $10,000 but that hardly counts). Washington ($1), Lincoln ($5), Jackson ($20), and Grant ($50) were all presidents. I suppose he didn’t do a good job because ten years later he was replaced by President McKinley.
  • The Secretary of State that signed the bill was William G. McAdoo, who served from 1913 to 1918 under President Woodrow Wilson.
  • On the back, there’s a picture of Hernando de Soto discovering the Mississippi River in 1541.
  • Normally, the blue Treasury seal on the bill indicates it’s a Silver Certificate.

  • 1928/1934 Green Seal Design

    $500 1918 McKinley Green Seal Design Front
    $500 1918 McKinley Green Seal Design Back

  • The 25th President of the United States, William McKinley, is featured on the face of the bill.
  • President McKinley was assassinated in Buffalo by Leon Czolgosz at the Pan-American Exposition in 1901.
  • The Secretary of the Treasury that signed the bill was Andrew W. Mellon, who served from 1921 to 1932, through three presidents (Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover).
  • The back of the bill has no picture, it just has an ornamental “500″ in the center.
  • Normally, the green Treasury seal on the bill indicates it’s a Federal Reserve Note.

I hope you enjoyed these facts about the five hundred dollar bill. It was a little trickier finding many facts about this bill since it’s not large enough of a denomination to get the attention the $100,000 bill gets, but I hope there were a few gems in there. If you didn’t get enough trivia, here are fifty fun facts about cold hard cash that I guarantee will teach you something you didn’t know beforehand! :)

(if you know of a fun fact I didn’t include about the $500, be sure to share it in the comments!)

{ 44 comments, please add your thoughts now! }

Related Posts


RSS Subscribe Like this article? Get all the latest articles sent to your email for free every day. Enter your email address and click "Subscribe." Your email will only be used for this daily subscription and you can unsubscribe anytime.

44 Responses to “Fun Trivia Facts about the $500 Bill”

  1. Nikki says:

    I have a $500.00 bill and would like to know what the process it to get rid of it. Can I sell it or take it to the bank? Thank you

    • trust me says:

      ill give you $50 for it

    • mike says:

      well you can take it to the bank and they’ll be glad to give you 500 dollars for it, it is still legal tender. however that’s a bad mistake seeings how you could sell it on the open market for at least 10 times that much depending on the condition. the least would be around 2000 dollars.

  2. Sean A says:

    You mentioned: “The Secretary of the Treasury that signed the bill was Andrew W. Mellon, who served from 1921 to 1932, through three presidents (Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover).”

    Which means that the 1934 (Roosevelt administration)$500 bill did not bear his signature. It instead belongs to Henry Morgenthau Jr (of the New Deal fame).

    The other signature the note bears is the one of the 28th Treasurer of the United States, William A. Julian.

  3. cj says:

    AWEsome!!!!!!!!!!

  4. David says:

    Talk about big bills. I have a One Hundred Trillion Dollar bill from The Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe handing on my wall now. Only problem, the economy of Zimbabwe collapsed, and it is simply a good conversation piece. I am told this is the largest denomination ever printed anywhere.

  5. greg moseley says:

    Are their any large bills to be bought out their and where can I get them?

  6. Tom_B says:

    http://www.bargaineering.com/articles/fun-trivia-facts-about-the-500-bill.html

    “Marshall was one of the non-Presidents to appear on a bill. Benjamin Franklin is on the $100 and Alexander Hamilton on the the $10 (Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury, is on the $10,000 but that hardly counts). Washington ($1), Lincoln ($5), Jackson ($20), and Grant ($50) were all presidents. I suppose he didn’t do a good job because ten years later he was replaced by President McKinley.”

    I believe you omitted Hamilton also having been on the $1,000, Jefferson currently on the $2.

    Thanks for this web site!

  7. Joe Betz says:

    Not having read all the comments, this comment may have already been made, but in case it has not. I would like to point out that the reverse of the 1918 Blue Seal bill says it’s a Federal Reserve Note. In fact if you look closely at the front of the Blue Seal note in very small letters the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” it also says Federal Reserve Note! How can that be if it was redeemable in silver? The article clearly says that the Blue seal note was a Silver Certificate and the Green seal was the Federal Reserve note, but both the front and back of the Blue seal seems to dispute that claim. Can someone clear up that mystery?

  8. DRB says:

    I keep telling my kids they need to worry when they have to start carrying large dollar denominations in their pockets to the grocery store.

    The way the government spends us into to debt, we will soon need a wheel barrel to take the money we need to by food at the store. I remember when I could by 20 Hershey bars for a dollar, and it was bigger then the one they sell today. Now a dollar will buy one.

    The money is becoming worthless. Soon you won’t be able to pay your taxes with it, because the government wont accept it. They will take land and housing and live stock though because it will have value.


Please Leave a Reply
Bargaineering Comment Policy


Previous Article: «
Next Article: »
Advertising Disclosure: Bargaineering may be compensated in exchange for featured placement of certain sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website.
About | Contact Me | Privacy Policy/Your California Privacy Rights | Terms of Use | Press
Copyright © 2014 by www.Bargaineering.com. All rights reserved.