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Resources to Learn About Stock Market Investing

Posted By Jim On 05/27/2008 @ 7:23 am In Investing | 4 Comments

If you know nothing about the stock market, consider yourself lucky.

If you think the stock market is a scary place that you don’t understand, you’re actually in good shape.

I learned about the stock market in a time of prosperity, in pieces, and probably in the worst possible way and it’s burned me on numerous occasions. When everything is going up and there’s an irrational exuberance, you are afforded the opportunity to have good results come out of bad decisions and that can lead to the development of bad habits. So, if you know nothing about the stock market and are scared of it, that’s actually the best time to start learning about it.

So, if you’re scared and I have bad habits, why should you read anything I have to say about investing? I don’t actually talk much about investing outside of discussing ideas and theories (and recommending index funds from Vanguard) but today I’ll outline a few good resources I’ve found to help you learn more about investing in the stock market.

Morningstar Investing Classroom

Morningstar [3] is great. The number one best place to start, if you know absolutely nothing, is with Morningstar’s Investing Classroom [4]. They have four areas of beginner study – Stocks, Funds, Portfolio and Bonds. Each classroom has five levels of study with the exception of Bonds, it only has two, and each level has anywhere from five to eleven courses. I’ve taken several of the courses and they begin with the basics and move onto progressively more advanced topics.

As a bonus, you earn points for answering the quizzes following each course and can redeem those points for various rewards (you have to be a free registered member to earn these credits).

Motley Fool’s Investing Basics

If you’ve completed all of Morningstar’s Investing Classroom courses, Motley Fool’s Investing Basics [5] is a great place to reinforce those ideas but with a witty and humorous twist. Depending on how quickly you went through the Morningstar site, you probably glossed over a few topics or forgotten others, so review can’t hurt. Plus they’re entertaining to read.

Decisions Decisions Decisions…

At this point, armed with the basics, you have to make a decision. Do you want to invest the your stock allocation in index/mutual funds or do you want to try to go your own way and invest in individual stocks? If the answer is index and mutual funds, you probably are armed with enough information go forth and conquer. Open an account with a Vanguard or a Fidelity and have it (those two always seem to dominate Top Fund lists). If you want to go after individual stocks… there is more learning ahead. (some would say there is more to learn but from here but between Morningstar and Fool, you have enough information to Google search from here)

Securities and Exchange Commission

The SEC has a great guide to financial statements [6], which you’re going to have to decipher and interpret if you hope to be able to pick some winners in the stock market. I would also get myself familiar with EDGAR [7], which is the SEC’s database of company filings (EDGAR Quick Guide [8], Comprehensive EDGAR Guide [9]). EDGAR is far more versatile (and comprehensive) than navigating company websites for their filings. They also have a pretty extensive Publications [10] section that has all sorts of valuable information.

Google Finance

If you want a very quick snapshot of a particular company, I think Google Finance [11] has the most amount of information on a single page and provides the easiest interface to reach it. Simply type in the ticker or name of the company and you can get a wealth of information on one page. You can access their related companies, their latest financials, recent and future events, key stats & ratios, a brief summary as well as links on their company website, list of officers and directors, as well as links to other resource reports such as SEC filings, MSN Money’s listed major holders, etc. All that information is one page, that’s why I like it over other similar services like Yahoo Finance (Yahoo Finance’s advantage is that you can add a lot of technical indicators to their charting services).

Wall Street Journal Markets Data Center

So, armed with that information, you probably have enough to go out and do some serious damage to your portfolio (take that any way you’d like ). Are you ready to be inundated with market data? If so, and my inundated I mean like drinking from a fire hose, then check out the Wall Street Journal Markets Data Center [12]. Pages and pages and pages of financial information at your finger tips. (if it’s intimidating, but that’s okay… and that’s just the home page, you can drill down even more!) It’s absolutely stunning… now go forth and conquer!


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[2] Email: mailto:?subject=http://www.bargaineering.com/articles/how-to-learn-about-stock-market-investing.html

[3] Morningstar: http://www.bargaineering.com/articles/r/morningstar.php?tag=LearnAboutInvesting

[4] Morningstar’s Investing Classroom: http://www.morningstar.com/cover/workshop.html

[5] Motley Fool’s Investing Basics: http://www.fool.com/school/basics/basics.htm?source=InvAg

[6] guide to financial statements: http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/begfinstmtguide.htm

[7] EDGAR: http://www.sec.gov/edgar/searchedgar/webusers.htm

[8] EDGAR Quick Guide: http://www.sec.gov/edgar/quickedgar.htm

[9] Comprehensive EDGAR Guide: http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/edgarguide.htm

[10] Publications: http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs.shtml

[11] Google Finance: http://finance.google.com

[12] Wall Street Journal Markets Data Center: http://online.wsj.com/mdc/public/page/marketsdata.html?mod=topnav_2_3000

Thank you for reading!