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Your Take: Best Mobile Personal Finance Tools

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Lifehacker readers recently voted on the best mobile personal finance tools and the winners were announced:

  • Mint – Free on Android/iOS
  • PageOne – Free on Android, iOS, BlackBerry, and Windows Mobile
  • EasyMoney – $9.95 on Android
  • Pocket Money – $4.99 on iOS
  • ProOnGo – $0.99/month on several platforms

I’ve only ever seen Mint and PageOnce, both of which impressed me (I don’t own an iPhone or an Android device, so I haven’t used them extensively), and I’m curious to know what you consider the “best mobile personal finance tool.” It can be anything money related (ProOnGo is more of a business app than a personal finance app), I’d like to know what’s out there so I can check it out and stay better informed!

{ 18 comments, please add your thoughts now! }

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18 Responses to “Your Take: Best Mobile Personal Finance Tools”

  1. SoonerNATX says:

    i personally use mint. The only thing i dont like is that i havent found a way to track my credit card payments. it views them as a wash b/c it is a debit on the account side and a credit on the card side. Therefore i get no cool statistics.
    Anyone figured this out? or is it b/c i havent spent time on the website since getting the iphone app?!?!

  2. Ryan says:

    I noticed Mint (both mobile and on computer) doesn’t accurately update my checking account. It’s usually a day behind, not real time.

  3. Mark says:

    YNAB. It’s re mobile companion to the desktop. Best program.

  4. cubiclegeoff says:

    I never warmed up to Mint and have always used Yodlee. However, lately, I use Yodlee a lot less than ever because I’ve made most of my bills be paid automatically, and I only have a handful of accounts that I check only so often.

  5. Courtney says:

    I use Easy Envelope Budget Aid (EEBA) on my Droid. We keep a detailed budget in an excel spreadsheet so I only needed something to keep track of our spending money “on the go” – it’s simple and more than one person can access it so we can both enter transactions and know exactly how much money we have left to spend each month.

  6. autumn says:

    Pageonce is the business! it really is great. I get a pop up on my phone AND an email with notifications like low balance, running low on phone minutes, bill almost due, new high balance etc. You can add virtually any account you want to track from frequent flyer miles to your cable bill to your investment account.

  7. Anthony says:

    I like Mint, but don’t use it. It doesn’t pull information from my credit union account, which is where most of my financial activity occurs in the first place.

    I have a checkbook ledger program called “Financisto.” Everything is manual and there is no online sync. It does what I need it to!

  8. Bill says:

    I use Pocket Money and find that it is the best checkbook register around, at least for the iPhone. The interface is clean and simple. Using the auto-fill option, recording a transaction takes less than 15 seconds. With the scanner option I am able to maintain a copy of my receipt (I only scan the important receipts).

    A very nice feature is the ability to email a copy of my register to myself as a backup. Instead of using the app’s desktop program, I use SyncDocs (from Sourceforge) to transfer data to my computer and Excel to analysis it.

    The app is well worth the $4.99 plus $.99 for the scanner.
    Highly recommended.

    The app has a budgeting option, but I have not used it yet.

  9. Erik says:

    I use Mint for desktop money management and something called MobaTech Mobile Checkbook on my blackberry.

    On the mobile checkbook app I created an account for each of my budget categories and just add any transactions to the categories as I go through the week. I then calculate based on the number of hours I worked during the week (I’m an independent contractor and a student) how much to “deposit” into each of my budget categories. Mobile Checkbook is the only app I’ve found that just gets out of you way and doesn’t ask you to put in the hair color of your banker etc.

    This combo works great for me. I love the goal tracking in Mint and you can set it to alert you if you make a transaction over X in any account, etc.

    I’ve been using my little system for over 3 months now and it’s really been working for me, I’ve been saving up a storm :D

  10. mint has my vote. simple, free, great blogspace to match.

  11. WRXTuan says:

    I use mint on my android phone but I rarely use it. I usually do my updates on the computer.

  12. eric says:

    I had a policy where I didn’t like having my financial info on my phone (just in case I lose it and stuff), but I’m thinking of trying out the YNAB companion app to the desktop program.

  13. zapeta says:

    I wish that YNAB had an app for Android. Their iPhone one looks awesome.

  14. Aaron says:

    I use mint on my Android phone. The only thing I don’t like about it is if you change the category for a transaction, while it does get updated, the phone won’t show the new category on the phone until you resync again. Otherwise, it’s a good mobile tool.

    Mint in general is great. The only glaring weakness is its support for future transaction is awful. I fashioned a system using Microsoft OneNote 2010 and its built-in calculator to forecast my future balance.

  15. Ron says:

    My favorite app is the http://www.moneystrands.com tool, i use it on the web and my iPhone. I really like the interface and the fact that it supports my banks and updates my information seamlessly, which I could never get mint to do.

  16. I’ve been using mint now for a couple weeks… its pretty good. Helps keep me on track, and gives me push notifications when I’m reaching any particular budget limits.

  17. lin says:

    I use mint on my Android phone. The only thing I don’t like about it is if you change the category for a transaction, while it does get updated, the phone won’t show the new category on the phone until you resync again. Otherwise, it’s a good mobile tool.

    Mint in general is great. The only glaring weakness is its support for future transaction is awful. I fashioned a system using Microsoft OneNote 2010 and its built-in calculator to forecast my future balance.

  18. Anon says:

    Yodlee is the best, but I am waiting for the app. Hurry up Yodlee!!!!


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