Reviews 
7
comments

Me 2.0: Build a Powerful Brand to Achieve Career Success by Dan Schawbel

Me 2.0: Build a Powerful Brand to Achieve Career Success by Dan SchawbelIf you want to learn how to effectively build your brand, something you’ll need and take with you regardless of who you work for, then you need to get Me 2.0 by Dan Schawbel because it’ll teach you all the techniques and tools you’ll need to master. One of the most important lessons I learned in becoming a full-time blogger was the importance of building a brand. Bargaineering has grown, mostly by accident, to one of the top personal finance blogs over the last four years. I’ve learned to use tools like videocasts, forums, Twitter, and internet radio to build up the Bargaineering brand and I’ve been blessed that people like you find value in what I write and speak about and continue to read and visit the site every day.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Career 
23
comments

Augment Yourself, Not Your Résumé

When I was a kid, my parents taught me that my job was to do well in school so that I could get into a good college. In college, my job was to do well, earn my diploma, and then get a good job. Once I started working, I was told that leaders take leadership training classes and took rotational assignments in areas others didn’t. I, of course, wanted to be a leader (that’s what’s next right?). I started signing up for all these classes that had great names and interesting content but really lacked any application in my day to day activities.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Business 
9
comments

Incentives Demoralizes Professional Activity

“Excessive reliance on incentives demoralizes professional activity.”

That’s a quote from a TED.com video I watched this week in which Barry Schwartz, Dorwin Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and social action at Swarthmore College and frequent contributor to the New York Times, calls for discusses how our society has gone mad with an abrupt loss of “practical wisdom” in the face of bureacracy, the failure of incentives, and rules often protect us from disaster but ensure mediocrity.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Reviews 
1
comments

Career Renegade by Jonathan Fields

Career Renegade by Jonathan FieldsJonathan Fields was once a “high-powered mega-firm Manhattan lawyer,” who worked “endless hours and was literally getting sick from the demands of is intense career,” that is, until a 72-hour work bender had him rushed into a stress-induced emergency surgery. He had a perforated intestine. Afterwards, he decided to leave his six-figure job and seek a better life based on meaning. He became a serial entrepreneur, building up several successful health and fitness companies (among other things) and penned Career Renegade – How to Make a Great Living Doing What You Love. What’s very interesting is that his story isn’t unique – Bargaineering contributor Gary Bonner worked himself into a heart attack and Professor Jim O’Donnell left a lucrative career in finance to pursue a life with greater meaning, but Jonathan Fields wrote a book about it.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Reviews 
2
comments

The Integrity Dividend by Tony Simons

The Integrity Dividend by Tony SimonsThe first thing I do when I get a book is flip open to the inside flap of the dust cover and read the summary. I like to get a fifteen second feel for the book before I dive right in.

The first line on the dust jacket read: “Corporate and government scandals continue to deepen our mistrust of leaders.” Tony Simons, author of the The Integrity Dividend and an associate professor of management and organizational behavior at the School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University, hit the nail on the head with that line. While the book was probably influenced by the Enron and similar scandals, corporate greed in financial companies and weak governmental oversight (or straight up looking the other way) the last five or ten years has combined to create an economic maelstrom the likes of which haven’t been seen in decades. Add it all together and you get an environment where employees may be distrustful of their management. Are the leaders of my firm focusing on the quick buck to keep shareholders happy or are they interested in building a long term future? Richard Fuld, ex-CEO of Lehman Brothers, earned half a billion dollars in cash between 2000 and 2008. Lehman is now bankrupt, leaving many employees with empty retirement accounts.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Career 
17
comments

File for Unemployment Benefits

Losing your job sucks and if you recently lost yours, I’m sorry to hear that but you are not alone (in May 2008, 861,000 joined the already 8.5 million unemployed, which is always undercalculated*). However, we live in the land of opportunity and there’s always something around the corner, so until that corner turns you should consider filing for unemployment benefits.

When people talk about unemployment benefits, you’re really talking about the Federal-State Unemployment Insurance Program and it’s a program you’ve been indirectly paying into with each and every paycheck. Your employer has to pay an unemployment insurance tax that you make claims against if you are eligible (and unemployed). You indirectly pay for the insurance because in the absence of that tax, you could theoretically be paid more (feel free to debate the merits of that argument on your own, either way it’s money that’s rightfully yours if eligible).

The eligibility requirements and benefit payouts vary from state to state. The US Department of Labor has a very handle list of all the state departments, along with address, phone number and website, to help you in your search and claims filing. You can also use this map to locate the proper office to contact.

File today. As soon as you lose your job, file immediately. There is often a two week lag between when you file and when you receive benefits, though benefits are effective as soon as you file (if you are eligible).

It has no bearing on you as an employee. In fact, being eligible for unemployment benefits couple a positive. One of the reasons for denying a claim is misconduct. Though it’s unlikely that an prospective employer would ever find out that you did receive unemployment benefits, if they did they could be reasonably sure that you didn’t get released because of misconduct.

It won’t affect your credit score. Collecting unemployment will have no bearing on your credit history or your score. If you do apply for a loan, it would be reported as unstable income which could cause you not to get a loan. However, if you think about it, unstable income is better than no income so you probably have a better shot at a loan with the benefits. :)

You need it. Even if you’re in solid financial shape, the reality is you don’t know how long you may be out of work. You may be great now, able to live off your emergency fund for a few months, but eventually your bank account will begin to dwindle. As the balance falls, you will be feeling more pressure at a time when pressure will already be at its highest. It’s important to swallow your pride, get yourself some additional breathing room, and file for benefits that are rightfully yours. Remember, it’s not welfare; it’s unemployment insurance your employer has been paying for.

If you’re reluctant to take a hand out, take it now and consider donating that amount to your favorite charity when you get back on your feet. Good luck.


 Devil's Advocate 
14
comments

Don’t Pay Your Dues

Devils Advocate Logo
This is a Devil's Advocate post.

A lot of young professionals hear this line all the time: “If you pay your dues, you will be rewarded by the company in the future.” Sometimes “paying your dues” refers to working your ass off for a few years, being a high performer, then getting rewarded with greater opportunities. That’s the good kind of “paying your dues.” The “paying your dues” I’m going to rail against today is the one where you basically work the grind, day in and day out, until you’ve been with a company long enough to be entrusted with more responsibility. That’s promotion based on tenure, not based on merit. That type of “paying your dues” is crap and here’s why you want to get out now.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Personal Finance 
12
comments

2008 Best Paying Jobs for Graduates

Graduation CakeEvery year, around this time of college graduation, various media outlets report the average salaries various college graduates and this year is no different. CNN and Careerbuilder are reporting, based on National Association of Colleges and Employers data, that salaries are up 4% this year compared to last year and hiring is expected to increase 8%. Take that recession! (cynics will say that employers are hiring cheaper graduates and dumping the more expensive seasoned employees!)

(Click to continue reading…)


Advertising Disclosure: Bargaineering may be compensated in exchange for featured placement of certain sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website.
About | Contact Me | Privacy Policy/Your California Privacy Rights | Terms of Use | Press
Copyright © 2014 by www.Bargaineering.com. All rights reserved.