Your Take 
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Your Take: Applaud the FDIC on WaMu & Wachovia Deals?

WaMu SucksThe bailout bill and its failure to pass the House, coupled with the 777 point fall of the Dow at the beginning of the week, has really dominated the headlines recently so it’s not surprising that not many people have focused on this bit of news – the FDIC managed to broker the sale of Washington Mutual to JPMorgan Chase and parts of Wachovia to Wells Fargo (link) Citigroup and they didn’t bankrupt themselves (or go to the government for more money).

For weeks (if not months), people have talking about how the failure of Washington Mutual, the largest thrift with $307 billion in assets, and the failure of Wachovia, who had a loan portfolio of $312 billion, would bankrupt the FDIC. The FDIC isn’t entirely off the hook though, the FDIC is backing some of the downside loss on the bad debt, but as it stands right now they managed settle two big issues without much loss.

If you’re curious as to the details of both deals, here’s an article about JPMorgan Chase acquiring WaMu assets and here’s an article about Wells Fargo buying up Wachovia’s deposits and banking business. While it still remains to be seen whether everything involving these banks is OK, it definitely two headaches off the radar for now.

Do you think we should applaud the FDIC for dodging a huge bullet (at least for now)? Or did we just shuffle the deck chairs?

(Photo: Sërch)


 Banking, Credit 
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Banks Cash Fat Checks First

According to an article in USA Today, Citigroup, Bank of America, Chase, Wachovia, Wells Fargo, HSBC, U.S. Bank and SunTrust, eight of the ten largest largest banks in the united states, will cash checks that they receive on the same day in an order that maximizes overdraft possibilities. They will cash the largest checks first and the smallest checks last – this rule also applies for electronic transactions as well.

The banks defend their move by saying they want to give priority to the largest checks because they say that the larger checks are typically more important and you’d rather get a credit card payment bounced than a mortgage payment. Consumer advocates that banks are trying to screw the consumer because banks are relying on fees to make their money now that the spread is smaller. To be entirely honest, the order those checks are cashed shouldn’t matter – you should always have enough money in the bank to cover every check you write, otherwise you shouldn’t write them (whoops, typo, thanks Nick).

The articles goes on to explain the plight of Sean Tucker, 29, whose ego wrote checks (one of which was for $3.33) his body couldn’t cash to the tune of six overdraft fees and $200 out of his pocket. I’m sorry Sean… you need to be cognizant of how much money you have in the bank and you certainly shouldn’t be writing checks if you’re even close to being over, it’s simply not difficult to keep track of that stuff and if you’re simply careless, you deserve the fees so you’ll learn not to do it next time.

Personally, I prefer the checks cashed from the largest to the smallest because I’d rather have a $50 water bill bounce than my mortgage payment.


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