Personal Finance 
60
comments

Asian Children Financially Supporting Parents

Him of Make Love Not Debt just recently wrote about Asian Culture and Finances and the concept of children supporting their parents and asked that I share my own thoughts on the subject.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Personal Finance 
3
comments

$300 Bills and Good Relationships

When I read this article about a $300 bill for four from Fogo De Chao on Make Love Not Debt (which included a bottle of wine), I smiled. No no, I’m not into schadenfreude (German word for taking pleasure in the misery of others). In the face of financial adversity, Her was able to share her feelings with Him. When you can do that, you know that you have a very strong relationship with open communication.

The $300 bill could’ve been anything. It could’ve been a car accident resulting in a $300 repair bill. It could’ve been a slip and fall that resulted in a $300 trip to the ER, but Her was able to share her unhappiness without assigning blame or trying to push guilt and so that’s something worth more than money and results in lasting relationships.

Incidentally, I think those chain churrascarias are usually around $50 per person dinnertime, which puts the starting bill for four at $200 before wine, taxes, and the dessert. I mean they’re really really good places and one of those once a year type of things, from a financial and a health perspective because all that meat can’t possibly be terribly healthy for you, but it certainly would take the wind out of anyone if they saw the bill without realizing the cost beforehand.


 Personal Finance 
103
comments

Should Married Couples Combine Finances?

Not by default. Married couples should do whatever it is they feel is right for them and their situation because everyone’s situation is different. For me, the answer to that question is yes. Many people always jump to the issue of trust whenever talking about combining finances because they assume that if you trust one another then you would combine your finances. If you trusted one another, you wouldn’t require a prenuptial agreement. If you trusted one another, you would have separate bank accounts and you wouldn’t draw the line so clearly.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Shopping 
13
comments

Spend Now or Save Now: An Age Old Dilemma

Lazy Man and I Have Plasmas, We Are Not Crazy…

Lazy Man penned a post in which he talked how he owned a plasma television and how personal finance bloggers called him crazy (technically, he only supposed that pfbloggers would call him crazy) and I’m here to back him up, I’m a pfblogger who wouldn’t call someone, with a plasma television, crazy. I would call that person foolish if they put the whole thing on a credit card and planned on paying it off over the next 234908230943 years at 203984230% interest (that’s quite a bit!), but I wouldn’t call them crazy.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Investing 
5
comments

Introduction to 529 Education Savings Plans

The key to being prepared is to learn about stuff before you need them and learning about 529, for me, certainly falls into that category! A 529 plan is an educational savings plan named after the section of the federal tax code that outlines the rules for them. Basically there are two types of 529 plans, prepaid tuition plans and college savings plans, but they are generally designed to help you save towards college for your children.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Personal Finance 
14
comments

What Is Your Everything Else Fund?

After you’ve funded your 401k, your Roth, and your emergency fund… where do you put the remainder of your savings? Do you just stick it in a high yield savings account where it can earn a respectable 5%+ interest or do you feel that it’s “wasted” there? Do you open up a brokerage account and slip the extra cash into a mutual fund, either actively or passively managed, so that it can get a shot at earning the market return, which is hopefully better than 5%?

That’s the situation I’m in right now. My fiancée and I currently have our emergency fund fattened up and sitting an FNBO Direct account, both of our Roth’s are fully funded for 2006, our 401k’s contributions are at least the minimum match, and we’re currently using a Vanguard account as our wedding savings fund with the funds invested in one of Vanguard’s target retirement funds. The question is, what do we do next? Just keep putting the rest into the brokerage account until we need it?


 Personal Finance 
25
comments

How Do You Calculate Net Worth For Couples?

I haven’t calculated a Net Worth value in several months now, mostly to hide the fact that I bought an engagement ring, but now I have a dilemma. Since my fiancée and I have begun using a joint checking account and direct depositing all of our money into it, I have no idea (or concept) of my net worth, only our net worth. So, I wanted to ask every engaged/married couple out there… when you calculate net worth (haha, I wouldn’t calculate it if I wasn’t writing a blog, to be entirely honest) do you just add all the assets together?

(Click to continue reading…)


 Banking 
18
comments

How Much To Keep In That Joint Bank Account

My fiance and I have a little dilemma: We have a joint checking and savings account that yields a paltry interest rate (it might as well be 0.00% but it’s some number slightly higher than that) and right now we’re having both of our paychecks deposited into that account. Our dilemma is that we don’t know how much money we should keep in that account because we’d like to keep that to a minimum and transfer the rest into her Emigrant Direct.

After a brief discussion in the car, we settled on $7,000. What we figured was that our monthly expenses is in the $3-$4,000 range combined at the maximum (a big chunk of that being the mortgage) so we figured twice that would be sufficient. Our monthly paychecks will still be deposited into the account but we figured we’d check the account and reduce the funds down to $7k whenever we saw that they were over. For major purchases, we’d then transfer funds into the account from her (or my) high yield savings account in order to pay for it.

Anyone have any thoughts on this? I’m starting to think $7,000 is a little high but the difference in interest earnings isn’t that much between $7k and, say, $5k.


Advertising Disclosure: Bargaineering may be compensated in exchange for featured placement of certain sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website.
About | Contact Me | Privacy Policy/Your California Privacy Rights | Terms of Use | Press
Copyright © 2014 by www.Bargaineering.com. All rights reserved.