Taxes 
14
comments

Where do I mail my tax return?

I don’t usually dispense much information about filling out IRS forms manually because I am a big believer in e-filing. There are, however, certain times when it’s necessary to mail in a form and where the benefits of e-filing are reduced significantly. For example, if you owe taxes, you can buy yourself a few extra days by mailing in the form which can mean the difference between bouncing a check and keeping the IRS happy.

Warning: These addresses are out of date. Please visit the IRS for the latest addresses.

That said, it’s not always easy to find where you need to mail something because the addresses change. On most forms, there will be a section that indicates where you should be mailing it. In the event you can’t find the instructions or you picked up just a form, here is a helpful list of addresses, organized by your state. Where you mail your tax return depends on where you live and whether you have included a payment and I recommend do a “Find” on this page (Ctrl-F) for your state, as this won’t be in alphabetical order because multiple states mail their forms to the same address.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Taxes 
8
comments

What is a Form W-2?

Form W-2The Form W-2 Wage and Tax Statement is a form that your employer sends you near the beginning of the calendar year. By law, they are required to mail it by January 31st, barring any special extensions, so that you have ample time to meet the April 15th income tax filing deadline.

When your employer sends you a copy of your W-2, they will also send a copy to the IRS. It’s important that, when you’re filling out your taxes, you enter this information correctly. You will be audited if the information on your return doesn’t match the information the IRS received from your employer.

(Click to continue reading…)


 Taxes 
14
comments

Where To Get Missing W-2 and 1099s Forms

If you’re like me, you won’t start thinking about taxes until maybe around April 1st, which is about a month and a half away; if you’re not like me and are instead smarter, more responsible, and more organized, you’ve probably started thinking about doing your taxes already. Even if you’re like me and won’t want to do your taxes until April, it’s important for you to make sure that you have all the forms you’ll need for the big day. I don’t mean IRS tax forms like a 1040, those you can get easily from irs.gov, the tax forms I’m referring to are all the 1099s and W-2s you should have already received from your employer, your banks, your brokerages, etc.

Where To Get Your W-2:

The deadline for your employer (or former employer) to mail out your W-2′s for 2006 was January 31st so if you haven’t received it yet then it was probably lost in the mail. If so, don’t panic, just request that your employer send you a new copy (you might have to pay a fee, depending on how cheap your employer is) but it will take some time so it’s important to make that request now rather than later. The W-2 form is really the only form you’ll need to include with your return.

Now, if you can’t get your employer to give you one (they’re just not very nice), you can call the IRS for help at (800) 829-1040. If that doesn’t yield any fruit (or you can’t get a copy before the due date), the last resort is to use Form 4852, which is a substitute, and you have to show that you made a good effort at getting your W-2.

Where To Get Your 1099s:

1099-INTs, MISCs, WHATEVERS, are all mailed out in the same time frame as the W-2s but there is one crucial difference between the W-2 and the 1099, you don’t include the 1099 forms with your return. That information, just like the W-2, has already been reported to the IRS and so it’s only for your use on your return (why this isn’t the case with W-2s, who knows).

The rule of thumb is that anyone who has paid you over $600 this year will issue you a 1099, so if you haven’t received it just call that person or company up and ask for a copy (if they want a fee, just have them tell you what they reported).

As for interest you’ve earned on deposits at banks, all banks will send you a 1099 if you earned more than $10 last year though they will report that amount regardless (Thanks Evan & Tom for the fix, you guys are right, my mind just skipped a beat on that one). Again, all you need to do is fill that information into the appropriate fields on your return, the form itself is unnecessary. If you haven’t received 1099 from all of your accounts, you can usually download them from the bank’s online website. Lately banks have been going the “all electronic” route so you’ll have to log into your account and print it out yourself. If that isn’t available, just stop on by a branch and ask for a printout.


Advertising Disclosure: Bargaineering may be compensated in exchange for featured placement of certain sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website.
About | Contact Me | Privacy Policy/Your California Privacy Rights | Terms of Use | Press
Copyright © 2014 by www.Bargaineering.com. All rights reserved.